The end is (nearly) nigh - D&B Business expectations

Thu, 08 Jun 2017  |  

The recent Dun & Bradstreet Business Expectations survey confirmed a softening in business expectations for the economy into the second half of 2017.

The link to the full survey results is here: https://dnb.com.au/_media/documents/DB%20Australian%20Business%20Expectations%20Survey%20-%20full%20-%20Q3%202017%20interim.pdf 

A summary of the survey findings are here:

As Australia grabs the world record for uninterrupted economic growth, the signs are mainly pointing downwards. Business performance for the first quarter has hit a four–year low, resulting in lower expectations for the second half of the year. Dun & Bradstreet's May Business Expectations Survey shows a generally muted outlook for the September quarter of 2017 despite employment expectations reaching a two-year high.

The official GDP data, which confirmed a clear slowing in the rate of economic growth, was fully anticipated by the Dun & Bradstreet Business survey. Business expectations have dropped off for the September quarter 2017 following a softer-than-expected March quarter on the back of lower actual sales, profits, employment, selling prices and investment in the first quarter. This continues to highlight the importance of the Business Expectations Survey as an early indicator in turning points in key aspects of the economy – in this instance overall economic growth. The survey also has a solid record in anticipating turning points in other variables such as selling prices, employment and profits.

A slow start to 2017 has led to a decline in optimism moving into the second half of the year. Dun & Bradstreet’s latest Business Expectations Survey shows a generally muted outlook for the September quarter of 2017; however, expectations for employment are at a more than two-year high. Businesses have flagged concerns about the rising cost of utilities, as well as online selling by competitors.

According to Dun & Bradstreet Economic Adviser Stephen Koukoulas: “The optimism from the business sector at the end of 2016 and the early part of 2017 has not been sustained. Business expectations remain cautious for the September quarter following the particularly weak ‘actual’ outcome for the March quarter.

The information from the business sector accords with the recent official news on the economy – sluggish growth characterised by weak sales, profits, and capital expenditure, yet surprising resilience in employment.

comments powered by Disqus

THE LATEST FROM THE KOUK

Politics Panel: Australia's intergenerational gap

Fri, 25 May 2018

I was one of the panel members of this podcast which was on ABC Radio National. 25 minutes of interesting discussion.

At this link: https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/breakfast/politics-panel-australias-intergenerational-gap/9798848 

Politics Panel: Australia's intergenerational gap

 With the federal budget handed down and the battle lines emerging for the next election, Australia's intergenerational gap is shaping up as a major political issue.

The Coalition is promising a host of sweeteners for retired voters while Labor is promising to pump more money into education and get housing prices down.
If you're a voter, there's a good chance your view of those promises will be informed by the year you were born.

Do we need to be worried about Australia's economic outlook?

Tue, 22 May 2018

This article first appeared on the Yahoo7 Finance web site at this link: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/need-worried-australias-economic-outlook-060611703.html 

----------------------------------------------------

Do we need to be worried about Australia's economic outlook?

The Reserve Bank of Australia reckons that the next move in official interest rates is more likely to be up than down. RBA Governor has said so in recent weeks as he talks up the prospects for the economy over the next year or two.

This is disconcerting news for everyone out there with a mortgage or a small business loan, especially in a climate where the business sector is doing it tough and when wages growth is floundering near record lows. The good news is that the RBA is likely to be wrong and the next move in interest rates could be down, such is the run of recent news on the economy. Failing an interest rate cut, the hard economic facts suggest that any interest rate rises are a long way into the future and if they do come, there will not be all that many.

At this point, it is important to bring together the issues that would need to unfold to see the RBA pull the lever to hike interest rates.  At the simplest level, the start of an interest rate hiking cycle would need to see annual GDP growth above 3.25 per cent, the unemployment rate falling to 5 per cent and less, wages growth lifting towards 3 per cent and more and underlying inflation increasing to 2.5 per cent.

This is where the RBA expectation for higher interest rates is on very thin ice.