The jobs data remain glum

Fri, 14 Apr 2017  |  

Despite the hoopla that greeted the labour force data which showed employment up 60,000 in March, the labour market, and with it the economy, remain entrenched in a quagmire of funk.

To be sure, the 60,000 rise in employment was welcome, but that jobs growth needs to be put in context of the prior months of disappointingly weak job creation. Annual employment growth remains under 1 per cent which is well below the run rate needed to make inroads into unemployment.

Speaking of which – the unemployment rate stayed at a high 5.9 per cent in March. It is at least 1 percentage point higher than the rate seen when the economy is running at full employment. And interestingly, 5.9 per cent is the same rate that prevailed at the peak of the global crisis!

From a macroeconomic management perspective, the 750,000 people unemployed are a huge resource, untapped and unproductive. Many have limited or depreciating skills. Yet the government wants to make it harder for people to get additional skills, training and education. It is content to have the economy slothfully meander while it focuses on fourth tier policy issues.

The social costs of unemployment are even greater.

There are few signs of better economic times ahead. The commodity price lift is rapidly reversing. The housing boom appears to be on the cusp of something that could turn ugly. Wages growth is so low that the prospects for an acceleration in consumer spending growth is remote.

Where is the segment of the economy that will kick start GDP growth to a much needed 3 to 3.5 per cent? What are the policy makers doing to try to make this happen?

Unless there is something miraculous in the budget, get set for the unemployment rate to break above 6 per cent in the next few months and for the number of unemployed to excess 800,000.

As a mark of economic management, such results confirm policy failure.

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THE LATEST FROM THE KOUK

Why don’t governments deliver policies that are good for the electorate?

Mon, 21 Aug 2017

This article first appeared on The Adelaide Review site at this link: https://adelaidereview.com.au/opinion/politics/paying-fair-share/ 

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Paying Their Fair Share

It’s the age-old question: why don’t governments deliver policies that are good for the electorate? Well, the answers are numerous.

Politics and policymaking should be simple. After all, being in government and delivering what voters want — making them happy in other words — and increasing the chances of re-election seems to be the proverbial win-win scenario.

Which begs the question, why don’t political parties do it?

Why don’t they deliver policies that are good for the electorate and good for their re-election chances?

Let’s cut to what the voters, in general, want.

A policy framework where each person who wants a job gets a job is key. In addition, access to quality and affordable health care and education, from kindergarten to university to trades training is fundamental. There are other issues that are basic, simple and fair.

Voters want the government to provide aged-care services that treat the older members of society with dignity. We want decent infrastructure, especially pubic transport and roads. We want people who are doing it tough to be supported by a welfare safety net — a decent rate of pension, unemployment benefits and disability support.

So far, so good.

Australia has given up on solving unemployment

Sun, 20 Aug 2017

This article first appeared on The New Daily website at this link: https://thenewdaily.com.au/money/finance-news/2017/08/16/stephen-koukoulas-unemployment/ 

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Australia has given up on solving unemployment

 It is a sad state of affairs to realise that the current crop of Australian policy-makers have effectively given up on reducing unemployment.

Treasury reckons that the lowest the unemployment rate can go without there being a wages and inflation breakout is around 5.25 per cent.

The Reserve Bank of Australia notes something similar, forecasting that even when the economy is growing strongly at an above-trend pace, the unemployment rate will hover between 5 and 6 per cent.
The current unemployment rate is 5.6 per cent or some 728,100 people – enough to fill the Melbourne Cricket Ground about seven times.

Given the Treasury and RBA estimates, it looks like Australia will never see fewer than about 700,000 people unemployed – no matter what kind of improvement we see in the latest jobless figures on Thursday.
It seems to be a peculiarly Australian issue. In the US, the unemployment rate is 4.3 per cent, in the UK it is 4.5 per cent, in Japan it is 2.8 per cent while in Germany, the unemployment rate is 3.9 per cent. And none of these countries is experiencing a wage/inflation problem. Indeed, even with the very low unemployment rate in Japan, wages are actually falling.