Aussie labour market: Why beauty is in the eye of the beholder

Sat, 18 Mar 2017  |  

This article first appeared in the Yahoo 7 website at this link: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/labour-market-why-beauty-is-in-the-eye-of-the-beholder-011836039.html?soc_src=social-sh&soc_trk=tw 

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Aussie labour market: Why beauty is in the eye of the beholder

Economic facts do not always give an accurate reading on the health of the economy. Or rather, they are open to interpretation and, as in most things, the beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Think of today’s labour force data.

The unemployment rate in seasonally adjusted terms in February was 5.9 per cent. Whether that is a ‘good’ or a ‘bad’ number is open to interpretation. Compared with January, the unemployment rate was 0.2 percentage points higher; compared with middle of 2015 ago, it was 0.4 percentage points lower; compared with the recent low point in the unemployment rate just prior to the global financial crisis, it was almost 2 percentage points higher.

See the difficulty in determining whether it’s a good or bad result?

The fact is that none of these comparisons give a complete picture on the health of the labour market or indeed, whether the unemployment rate at 5.9 per cent is good, bad or indifferent.

Suffice to say, each month the unemployment rate should be compared with the level of full employment in the economy. In other words, it should be judged in context of whether the economy has been performing strongly enough to ensure that everyone who wants a job has a job. Anything less is failure.

Using economic jargon, full employment occurs when the unemployment rate is as low as possible but consistent with a sustainable rate of wages growth that is in turn consistent with the official 2 to 3 per cent target for inflation. The recent history for Australia suggests that the full employment unemployment rate is around 4.5 to 5 per cent or a tick lower.

Today’s 5.7 per cent unemployment rate is far from good. It is around 1 to 1.5 percentage point higher than it should be which owes much to the last half decade of below trend economic growth. The economy simply hasn’t been growing fast enough to generate the economic activity needed boost employment and drive the unemployment rate lower.

The current forecasts from Treasury and the Reserve Bank of Australia are for the unemployment rate to remain around 5 to 5.5 per cent for the next couple of years – and this assumes, perhaps optimistically, further strong momentum in the global economy, a positive influence from the higher terms of trade and ongoing low interest rates.

In other words, the outlook for unemployment is reasonable without testing full employment. And if anything goes wrong, say commodity prices tick lower or the housing market falters, the unemployment rate will remain in a 5.5 to 6 per cent range. It is too high.

To achieve a lower unemployment rate and full employment, domestic policy settings need to be directed at stronger growth. Interest rates could be cut, for example. With the US Federal Reserve hiking interest rates this morning, a rate cut in Australia would probably drive the Australian dollar lower which would boost the local economy. In the budget, which is less than two months away, the government could deliver a mild fiscal stimulus aimed at moving the economy towards full employment.

In the interim, the unemployment rate is too high. That unemployment rate translates to 750,000 people unemployed. A full employment target is not only imposing a social cost, but it represents untapped resources that, if utilized, would add to growth.

Lowering unemployment is not only good for those who are currently unemployed, it is good for the economy.

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The Australian stock market is a global dog.

Sat, 24 Jun 2017

This article first appeared on the Yahoo7 web page at this link: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/1381246-234254873.html 

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The Australian stock market is a global dog.

At a time when stock markets in the big, industrialised countries are zooming to record high after record high, the ASX200 index is going no where. So poor has the performance been that the ASX is around 20 per cent below the level prevailing in 2008.

It is a picture most evident in the last few years. Since the middle of 2013, the ASX 200 has risen by just 10 per cent. The US stock market, by contrast, has risen by 50 per cent, in Germany the rise has been 55 per cent, in Canada the rise has been 20 per cent, in Japan the rise has been 45 per cent while in the UK, with all its troubles, the rise has been 15 per cent.

So what has gone wrong?

Tony Abbott and debt

Fri, 16 Jun 2017

With Tony Abbott and governemnt debt hot news topics at the moment, I thought I would repost this artricle which I wrote in April 2013:

Enjoy, SK

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Here’s a true story. It’s about a man called Tony.

Tony is a hard working Aussie, doing his best to provide for his family. He has a good job, but such is the nature of his work that his income is subject to unpredictable, sharp and sudden changes.

Tony’s much loved and wonderful children go to a private school and wow, those fees that he choses to pay are high. He used to have a moderate mortgage, especially given he was doing well with an income well over $200,000 per annum.

Then things on the income side turned sour.

Tony had a change in work status that resulted in his annual income dropping by around $90,000 – a big loss in anyone’s language.

How did Tony respond to this 40 per cent drop in income?

Well, rather than selling the house and moving into smaller, more affordable premises, or taking his children out of the private school system and saving tens of thousands of after tax dollars, Tony called up his friendly mortgage provider and refinanced his mortgage.

In other words, Tony took on a huge chunk of extra debt so that he could maintain his family’s lifestyle. No belt tightening, no attempt to live within his means, just more debt.