Housing affordability - get the facts right and the right facts

Wed, 08 Mar 2017  |  

I continue to wonder why the super-charged debate on Australian housing is so devoid of reliable facts and analysis. So much of the debate relies on privately manufactured snake oil, made up of unproven survey results, pretend numbers, factual errors and sweeping generalisations that fit into the "OMG I'll never be able to buy a house" narrative that generates lots of clicks and unleashes pent up anger. The media, or a large part of it, love these 'crises' and report the snake oil without doing any background checking or research to see whether the report they are covering is in any way accurate. 

So little of the news, reporting and commentary makes reference to the comprehensive, in depth, reliable, considered and unbiased research of the RBA.

While house prices are not a direct policy aim of the RBA, distortions in the housing market can have consequences for the marco economy, inflation and financial stability, which is why it spends a lot of time researching the issue and, thankfully for those with an open mind, the RBA published much of its findings.

For those interested in housing and who are eager to understand the issues, can I suggest the following articles, rather that the tosh published by headline grabbing spriukers. It might take a little time to read and take in all of the information, but if you at least read these articles, you will be better informed. 

Opening Remarks to Plenary Panel at the Australasian Housing Researchers Conference – Luci Ellis
https://www.rba.gov.au/speeches/2017/sp-ag-2017-02-16.html 

Housing Prices, Mortgage Interest Rates and the Rising Share of Capital Income in the United States – Gianni La Cava
https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/2016/2016-04.html 

Submission to the Inquiry into Home Ownership
https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/submissions/housing-and-housing-finance/inquiry-into-home-ownership/ 

Is Housing Overvalued? – Ryan Fox and Peter Tulip
https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/2014/2014-06.html 

Over to you! 

 

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THE LATEST FROM THE KOUK

Employment - the odd one out or is the economy booming?

Thu, 19 Oct 2017

I am reluctant to bag and slag the employment data, because it is all we have when looking at the health of the labour market. But there are a few quirky bits and bobs in the news of the wonderful run of job creation over the past year.

Employment rose by a remarkably strong 3.1 per cent in the year to September, a fabulous result.

But, and it is a big but, the results are at odds with just about every other indicator in the economy. EIther they are misleading or the employment data are misleading.

One way to check it to have a look at the economy the last time annual growth in employment was above 3 per cent. This takes us to the period around 2007 and into early 2008.

In 2007, annual real GDP growth was generally around 4 to 5 per cent, as you would expect with such jobs growth. The economy was on fire!  In 2008, the CPI surged by over 4 per cent which is again as you would expect given the boom in employment. The RBA was hiking rates at an agressive pace, with the official cash rate hitting a stonking 7.25 per cent in 2008. Wow! 

What bubble? The financial sector is fighting fit

Tue, 17 Oct 2017

This article first appeared on the Yahoo 7 Finance website at this link: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/1897318-045821149.html 

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What bubble? The financial sector is fighting fit

Australia’s banking sector is in peak health and the household sector is having few if any problems managing its debt.

This is the good news from the Reserve Bank of Australia Financial Stability Report which effectively put the kybosh on the fear-mongers who continue to forecast a crisis in household debt, a crash in house prices and turmoil in the financial system and more specifically, the banks.

The key conclusion from the RBA was that “the financial system is in a strong position and its resilience to adverse shocks has increased over recent years.”

These are strong and direct words from the normally cautious RBA.

It also noted that the bank’s non-performing loans (bad debts in other words) “remain low” and bank profitability “is high”, which are the key indicators of financial stability and strength. The RBA went as far to say that “the banks also have ample access to a range of funding sources at a lower cost than a decade ago” which is fundamental to the functioning of the financial system. Nothing was presented that indicated current problems in the financial sector.

The RBA assessment can be tested from the markets, specifically bank share prices. Most evidently, bank share prices remain strong as the investment community continues to place its money where its mouth is when determining actual performance and even risks when allocating investment funds.