Housing affordability - get the facts right and the right facts

Wed, 08 Mar 2017  |  

I continue to wonder why the super-charged debate on Australian housing is so devoid of reliable facts and analysis. So much of the debate relies on privately manufactured snake oil, made up of unproven survey results, pretend numbers, factual errors and sweeping generalisations that fit into the "OMG I'll never be able to buy a house" narrative that generates lots of clicks and unleashes pent up anger. The media, or a large part of it, love these 'crises' and report the snake oil without doing any background checking or research to see whether the report they are covering is in any way accurate. 

So little of the news, reporting and commentary makes reference to the comprehensive, in depth, reliable, considered and unbiased research of the RBA.

While house prices are not a direct policy aim of the RBA, distortions in the housing market can have consequences for the marco economy, inflation and financial stability, which is why it spends a lot of time researching the issue and, thankfully for those with an open mind, the RBA published much of its findings.

For those interested in housing and who are eager to understand the issues, can I suggest the following articles, rather that the tosh published by headline grabbing spriukers. It might take a little time to read and take in all of the information, but if you at least read these articles, you will be better informed. 

Opening Remarks to Plenary Panel at the Australasian Housing Researchers Conference – Luci Ellis
https://www.rba.gov.au/speeches/2017/sp-ag-2017-02-16.html 

Housing Prices, Mortgage Interest Rates and the Rising Share of Capital Income in the United States – Gianni La Cava
https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/2016/2016-04.html 

Submission to the Inquiry into Home Ownership
https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/submissions/housing-and-housing-finance/inquiry-into-home-ownership/ 

Is Housing Overvalued? – Ryan Fox and Peter Tulip
https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/2014/2014-06.html 

Over to you! 

 

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THE LATEST FROM THE KOUK

Why are Bill Shorten and Labor scared to run on the economy?

Tue, 21 Mar 2017

This article first appeared on The Guardian website at this link: https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/mar/16/why-are-bill-shorten-and-labor-scared-to-run-on-the-economy 

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Why are Bill Shorten and Labor scared to run on the economy?

The dust is settling from the Western Australian election and there are some implications for the way the federal Labor party should conduct itself from now until the next election if it is to enhance its chances of winning.

For the Liberal party, the lessons are clear. It might sound trite to mention it but its electoral success will depend almost exclusively on its ability to deliver materially better economic conditions between now and election day.

For Labor, the task is easier. It needs to take the initiative on the economy, economic policy, the budget deficit and government debt and highlight how poor the Coalition has been in most aspects of economic managements since the 2013 election.

In those three-and-a-half years of the Coalition being in charge of the economy and budget, growth has been sluggish despite favourable conditions in Australia’s major trading partners. The Australian economy should be stronger because of the welcome news of the Australian dollar falling sharply in recent years, which has provided a boost to domestic economic conditions. What’s more, interest rates have been cut to record lows, yet the economy has been struggling to register annual GDP growth near 2.5%, the unemployment rate is the same as when the Coalition won the 2013 election, wages growth has plummeted to a record low, and the government debt has grown significantly faster than during the previous Labor government, which of course included the fiscal stimulus measures that kept Australia out of recession.

Ever since the mid-1990s, the Labor party has been reluctant to run hard on issues to do with the economy. For some reason, it is riddled with self-doubt that stems, it appears, from the high interest rates of the late 1980s and early 1990s, and its proactive use of budget debts and moderate debt accumulation during the global crisis to ensure Australia kept growing and to protect an estimated 200,000 jobs.

A $2 billion national building snow job

Sat, 18 Mar 2017

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull reckons his Snowy Hydro $2 billion investment is a “nation building project”.

Yes, that is what he said. Really. Turnbull think a one-off $2 billion government infrastructure project is “nation building”.

Let’s look at $2 billion in the context of the Australian economy.

In the December quarter 2016, Australia’s GDP was $435,445 billion dollars (seasonally adjusted). This works out at $4,769 billion a day which makes the $2 billion snow job about 10 hours GDP.

Useful? Sure!

Nation building? Ha!

By 2020, Australia’s GDP will be around $510,000 billion a quarter and $2 billion will be akin to about 8 hours GDP.

Here’s what elese $2 billion is now days.