Thu, 01 Feb 2018  |  

Deputy Prime Minister and former Shadow Minister for Finance and Debt Reduction came up with an economic doozie when he recommended that people “cash out your house in Sydney, Melbourne or Brisbane, and buy a house in Armidale and you put money in the bank”.

It is a quaint idea until you look at a few basic facts.

The combined population of Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane is around 13 million.

According to the website, there are 477 properties for sale in Armidale. There are a further 160 available for rent. If 0.004 per cent of the population of Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane took up the challenge and bought and rented in Armidale, all properties would be sold and rented. There would be a crazed bidding for housing and prices would go crazy and indeed, there would be a serious dwelling shortage.

Local renters would be crunched when rents were renegotiated and propbably have to leave.

Interestingly, the population of Armidale is 23,000. It would rise 3 fold if just 0.5 per cent of the people of Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane took up Mr Joyce’s challenge to move. Imagine the stress on the schools, hospitals and roads.

Mr Joyce’s idea is a good one as long as no one takes it up.

Thu, 01 Feb 2018  |  

This article first appeared on the Yahoo 7 Finance website at this link: 


Is negative gearing about to change?

If the polls and betting markets are correct, there is a good chance that Labor will win the next election and the negative gearing rules that have driven personal investment in housing for many decades will change.

With the Federal election set to be held late this year or early next, Labor are committing to change the policies regarding negative gearing which will radically change the way future investment in the housing market will be allocated.

It is important to emphasise that Labor is not planning to get rid of negative gearing. Far from it. Labor’s policy change boils down to keeping the existing rules for negative gearing for investors buying newly built dwellings, but ending the eligibility of negative gearing for established dwellings. For those investors wanting to negative gear, and there is no doubt there will still be many, it will still be available for new properties. Fill your boots, as they say!

It has been obvious for many years, perhaps decades, that one of the critical issues driving the extreme price rises in the Australian housing market is a lack of supply, relative to demand which has been driven by rampant population growth. In other words, there has not been enough new construction to adequately house the extra population and this shortage has seen prices rise.

The Labor policy change will encourage investment flows to new construction and over time this will help to address the supply / demand imbalance.

What the change to negative gearing will also mean is that demand from investors for established dwellings will fall away markedly. To be sure, people will still be able to buy multiple investment properties if they so desire, but they wont be able to use the tax laws to get other tax payers to subsidise the interest on the debt used to purchase those dwellings.

Tue, 30 Jan 2018  |  

US bond yields are rising more quickly than the equivalent Australian yields.

The 10 year government bond in the US is now yiedling 2.71 per cent, just 14 basis points below the Australian 10 year bond and if the recent trends in the relative economic fundamentals of the two countries is sustained, Australian 10 year yields will fall below those in the US.

It is possible, and indeed my base case that over the next few months, Australian 10 year yields will be 50 basis points below those of the US. US Fed rate hikes, the RBA on hold and soon to change its rhetoric on its wishes for monetary policy will be the triggers for this move.

It is also likely to mean that the Australian dollar, which is currently sniffing the ozone around 0.8100, will fall back, perhaps sharply. The looming election, an uncertain outlook for China and commodity prices and the deterioration in the trade position are also set to undermine AUD strength.

It is not often Australian interest rates are lower than in the US, but with its economy strong and Australia still somewhat problematic, we are about to see this rare event unfold.



Wed, 24 Jan 2018  |  

Podcast on the economy: This link is to my chat with Philip Clark on Nightline, ABC radio about the year ahead in 2018: 

I must say the caller’s questions were a highlight.


Tue, 23 Jan 2018  |  

This article first appeared on the Yahoo 7 Finance website at this link: 


'Disconcerting': 5 reasons why interest rates wont rise

Interest rates are about to rise.

So say a growing number of economists and the money market futures which are now pricing in a 25 basis point interest rate rise in the final quarter of 2018 and a further 25 basis point rise in the second quarter of 2019.

The market and many economists are increasingly optimistic that economic growth, wages and inflation will all of a sudden lift back to levels consistent with a healthy economy. The theory is that as a result of this good economic news, the hand of the RBA will be forced to hike rates from what are currently record lows. To be sure, these interest rate rises could happen over that time frame. It would be a most welcome development to see interest rates move higher as it would be a sign of a return to favourable economic conditions for the first time in many years.

But just how reliable are the forecasts and the market pricing?

Mon, 22 Jan 2018  |  

This article first appeared on the Yahoo7 Finance website at this link: 


Get ready for election economics

Let’s get a bit of basic economics and budget analysis sorted out as 2018, a likely year for the next Federal election, starts to unfold.

Tax cuts do stimulate economic growth.

Be it company or income taxes that are cut, the impact on economic growth will be positive, at least in the short run. When the government decides to cut taxes by, say, $1 billion a year, there is a simple transfer of $1 billion cash from the government sector with its saving level reduced by that amount, to the private sector. That $1 billion will be available to be spent, invested or even saved by the private sector. Whatever the end mix, there is a boost to the economy.

And yes, it is as simple as that.

But what if the government decides to spend $1 billion extra on educational, roads, consultants, health care, or any other purpose for that matter?

Well, that would stimulate the economy too. The effect would be different to a tax cut because the money would be directed to a specific area (consultants for example) and not as broadly based as a tax cut. But in the end, $1 billion of cash is simply transferred from the government into the bank accounts of those receiving the money via the extra spending.

Again, it is that simple.

Fri, 19 Jan 2018  |  

The recent house price data from Corelogic are showing further falls in house prices.

The falls are, disconcertingly, most evident in Sydney where prices have dropped 0.5 per cent so far in January, which brings the aggregate fall since the September 2017 peak to a chunky 2.9 per cent. This means that for a $1 million property in September, the value has fallen $29,000 in just 4 months.

The house price weakness is not confined to Sydney.

In Melbourne, the Corelogic data shows house prices topping-out. Prices are down 0.3 per cent from the December 2017 peak which, to be sure, is not a large decline after the stunning increases of previous years, but a fall it is.

Thu, 18 Jan 2018  |  

There was another round of euphoria as the monthly labour force data hit the screens. The data showed a nice 34,700 rise in employment in December which brought the total rise in jobs in 2017 to 403,100.

This is good news, to be sure, but how good is it really? What is the context for this increase in employment and how is Australia going in an ever vibrant and dynamic global economy?

Of some concern, Australia’s unemployment rate remains at 5.5 per cent – it actually ticked up from 5.4 per cent the prior month. Interestingly, and something less favourable, is the fact that the unemployment rate has been below 5.5 per cent for just two months (October and November 2017) in the last four and half years. Where is that 5 per cent or lower full-employment target everyone reckons we are near?

What’s more interesting, and a sign of the policy sloth that Australia is enduring at the moment, is that around the world, unemployment rates are falling and are impressively low.

Sure each country will have its quirks but have a look at our 5.5 per cent against these countries.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018  |  

This article first appeared on the Dynamic Syndications website at this link: 


Racehorse Ownership Sets Record High

 Fantastic news in the racing industry.

Race horse ownership hit a record high in 2016-17, with Syndications giving an increasing number of people access to a share in a racing thoroughbred.

In 2016-17, there were 79,631 owners of a race horse or a share in a race horse. This is up 0.9 per cent from the number a year earlier and up a healthy 16.8 per cent from the level 5 years earlier in 2011-12.

The nature of horse ownership is changing. The number of registered horses to have 10 or more owners rose to a record high of 1,736 which represented 15.3 per cent of all registered horses. Just think of it, one in seven horses running around Australia’s race tracks is owned by 10 or more people. Back in 2005-06, there were only 659 horses with 10 or more owners, which was just 4.8 per cent of all registered owners.

Thu, 11 Jan 2018  |  

Every man, woman and their dog was blown away with the massive 1.2 per cent rise in Australian retail sales in November. It was enough to spark a sell-off in the bond market and a jump in the Aussie dollar.

The ABS noted in the release that the surge was influenced by the release of the iPhoneX which at around $1,500 a pop, was a big enough issue to mention.

Of course, the iPhoneX was released around the world at the same time in November which prompted me to have a look at the retail sales results in other parts of the world – to see if the iPhone effect was important elsewhere or just confined to Australia.

And guess what?


As house prices fall across Australia, should we be worried for our economy?

Tue, 13 Mar 2018

This article first appeared on the Yahoo7 Finance website at this link: 


As house prices fall across Australia, should we be worried for our economy?

Are you a home owner?

If you are in Sydney, Perth and Darwin, you are losing money at a rapid rate.

In Melbourne and Canberra, prices are topping out and there is a growing risk that prices will fall through the course of this year. If your dwelling is in Brisbane or Adelaide, you are experiencing only gentle price increases, whilst the only city of strength is Hobart, where house prices are up over 13 per cent in the past year.

The house price data, which are compiled by Corelogic, are flashing something of a warning light on the health of the housing market and therefore the overall economy. For the moment, the drop in house prices has not been sufficient to unsettle the economy, even though consumer spending has been moderate over the past year.

The importance of house prices on the health of the economy is shown in the broad trend where the cities that have the weakest housing markets tend to have the slowest growth in consumer spending and are the worst performance for employment and the unemployment rate. The cities with the strongest house prices have strong labour markets and more robust consumer spending.

Trump could cause the next global recession: here's how

Wed, 07 Mar 2018

This article first appeared on the Yahoo7 Finance website at this link: 


Trump could cause the next global recession: here's how

The Trump trade wars threaten the global economy. This is not an exaggeration or headline grabbing claim, but an economic slump based on a US inspired global trade war is a distinct and growing possibility as it would dislocate global trade flows, production chains and bottom line economic growth.

Up until a few weeks ago, there was a strong enthusiasm for the economic policies of US President Donald Trump. Tax cuts and planned infrastructure spending were seen to be good for the US and world economies. US stocks and many around the rest of the world rose strongly, to a series of record highs. At the same time, bond yields (market interest rates) surged as the market priced in interest rate hikes and inflation risks from the ‘pro-growth’ policies. It was seen to be good news.

Very few, it seems, were worried about the consequences for US government debt and the budget deficit from this cash splash, especially when the US Federal Reserve was already on a well publicised path to hiking interest rates.

About a month or two ago, a few of the more enlightened and inquisitive analysts started to focus on the fact that the annual budget deficit under Trump was poised to explode above US$1 trillion with US government set to exceed 100 per cent of annual GDP.

A debt binge fuelled by tax cuts was a threat to the economy after the temporary sugar hit.