Blog

Fri, 11 Apr 2014  |  

The MYEFO fudges imposed on a weak and shell-shocked Treasury by Treasurer Joe Hockey and his office back in December are being shown up in the run of recent data.

This time, it is employment.

The MYEFO forecasts from Mr Hockey were for employment to rise by 0.75 per cent over the year to the June quarter 2014. This was 0.25 per cent lower than the employment growth forecast that was published in the independently prepared PEFO in August. That 0.25 per cent, as will be clear, is about 30,000 jobs and in budget terms, a lot of money.

The ABS released the March labour force data yesterday and those numbers confirmed what most sober analysis was suggesting and that is a solid pick up in employment growth in recent months is well underway as the overall rate of economic growth accelerates.

The most recent labour force data mean that for the MYEFO employment forecast to be correct, monthly employment over April, May and June has to average growth of a puny 5,000. This may be correct, but it's very unlikely. An average of 29,000 jobs were added over the last three months.

Given the momentum in economic growth, the rise in job advertisements and other labour market forward indicators, it is not unreasonable to expect average monthly employment increases of, conservatively, 15,000 a month over the next three months. If this is what happens, then the PEFO forecast of 1 per cent employment growth will prevail and the whole scam of cooking the books in MYEFO will be further exposed.

If the job creation of the March quarter is repeated in the June quarter, then annual employment growth will be nearer 1.25 per cent.

The end point is that the MYEFO numbers were the result of the new Treasurer, Mr Hockey, trying to make a lousy political point that had little to do with the true position of the economy.

The economy is doing well, really well in fact and we all should be delighted that jobs growth is picking up and the unemployment rate is ticking down. This is what, in my view, economic policy is all about. It is a pity that Mr Hockey prefers to play the petty debt and deficit political game.

Thu, 10 Apr 2014  |  

Not surprisingly, the move to an above trend growth rate for the economy over the past half year or so is now generating a decent rate of employment growth. What's more, it now appears that the unemployment rate has peaked and that by this time next year, the unemployment rate will likely be around 5.5 per cent, perhaps a little less.

Over the three months of the March quarter, employment has increased by 88,000, to register the largest quarterly increase since the March quarter 2012.

Tue, 08 Apr 2014  |  

The favourable news on the economy is unrelenting.

After the flood of extremely positive news last week, there has been further reinforcement of the clear upswing in a couple of series released in the last day and a bit.

Yesterday saw the number of job advertisements, as measured by the ANZ, lock in five straight months of increase in trend terms. There is now no doubt that employment growth will also lift in the months ahead and the unemployment rate will start to fall very soon.

Sun, 06 Apr 2014  |  

 

This article, written on behalf of Per Capita, first appeared on The Drum website:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-04-03/koukoulas-our-rolls-royce-budget-can-handle-a-flat-tyre/5363402

Australia is in a fine budget position and the deficit isn't nearly as big an issue as some politicians would have you believe. Just ask the credit rating agencies, writes Stephen Koukoulas.

The budget debate in Australia is so pathetically inane that the fiscal blame game has reached a point where neither side of politics wants to take responsibility for Australia's triple-A rated fiscal settings.

This perverse situation shows up with the notion that debt and deficit are political poison rather than the medicine that, when used wisely, has delivered spectacular wealth-creating returns for the economy.

Fri, 04 Apr 2014  |  

The latest $700 million bond issue by the Abbott government brings the cumulative total of gross borrowing since the election to $64.15 billion. What is extraordinary about this is not the borrowing itself, but the fact that after 7 months in office, the government has not implemented any meaningful policies to stem the rise in debt accumulation.

The AOFM has indicated it will be borrowing a further $1.4 billion next week.

Indeed, as the Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook showed, policy decision taken by the new government added $13 billion to the budget deficit.

Thu, 03 Apr 2014  |  

The run of data in the few days since Tuesday's meeting of the RBA Board has continued the trend of strength, confirming a substantial lift in the non-mining investment parts of the economy.

The RBA appears to be too gloomy with its views on growth and sanguine on inflation as it happily leaves interest rates at record lows, inflating house prices along the way and allowing the rest of the economy to pick up momentum at an increasingly worrying pace.

Tue, 01 Apr 2014  |  

As I sit back and contemplate what is, I often wonder which is more damaging to the Australian economy: rapidly inflating house prices which are starting to look and smell a bit bubble-ish, or on the other hand, a strong Australian dollar which sort of, maybe, kind of, perhaps is a bit overvalued?

The lever pullers at the RBA clearly think it's the Aussie dollar rising that is the biggest threat with its decision today to let the house price surge continue unchecked with interest rates being held at record lows.

I don't agree with the RBA. One reason is that I am not sure the Australian dollar is all that over valued, while I am also unsure whether interest rate hikes would see its value rise for any sustained period. After all, if interest rate differentials were the main driver of currencies, the Japanese yen would be worth next to nothing and the Turkish Lira would be a world beater.

Mon, 31 Mar 2014  |  

My old sparing partner and AFR scribe, Christopher Joye, thinks "when [house] prices do start sliding, it is not inconceivable that we could see unprecedented 10 to 20 per cent losses across the board".

While I am clearly worried about the current run up in house prices and can see a period where house prices will falter as the RBA moves to a monetary policy tightening cycle, Chris' view of such large falls seems to be askew.

As a result, I am offering Chris a simple two-tiered offer based on his forecast.

Mon, 31 Mar 2014  |  

The RPData five city house price index rose a thumping 2.3 per cent in March which is a stunning rate of increase at a time when house prices are already elevated.

For the first three months of 2014, the RPData series shows house prices up 3.5 per cent, or an annualised pace of close to 15 per cent. This is a rate of increase that must be causing the RBA some concerns as it continues to sit on official interest rates at a record low 2.5 per cent.

While the RBA does not target house prices with its monetary policy settings, it is well aware of the macroeconomic policy risks that come with house price booms... and busts. House price booms generally lead to a pick up in speculative borrowing and a ratcheting down of lending standards by financial institutions as every one wants to get on board the price surge.

Fri, 28 Mar 2014  |  

It is refreshing to see the RBA catching up to my view about the strength of the domestic economy. In recent days and weeks, RBA officials have finally acknowledged some of the general risks to inflation associated with a clear strengthening in the non-mining parts of the economy and from what is an increasingly worrying lift in house prices.

The RBA Board meeting next Tuesday, 1 April, is likely to throw a few more hints that the current 2.5 per cent cash rate is not appropriate for the current fundamentals. The foreign exchange market understanding this as the AUD powers to 0.93 US, even though it is taking an eternity for the many strategists to roll over to the new information.

Booming double digit growth in house prices, a record high level of new housing construction, rising commodity prices, exports surging in both volume and value terms and consumer demand expanding at a solid clip are threatening to put a rocket under inflation, which has already been marching higher since the middle of last year.

THE LATEST FROM THE KOUK

Don’t look now – you are almost certainly poorer than a year ago

Wed, 09 Jan 2019

This article first appeared on the Yahoo Finance web page at this link: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/dont-look-now-almost-certainly-poorer-year-ago-211934583.html 

------------------------------------------------------------

Don’t look now – you are almost certainly poorer than a year ago

I am sorry to kick off the new year with some gloomy news of your finances.

It is never nice to discuss how much money you have lost, but if you are a home owner in Sydney, Melbourne, Perth or Darwin and if you have a superannuation nest egg, the odds are you are less wealthy today than you were a year or two ago.

Here are some uncomfortable facts.

The Australian stock market, where the bulk of your superannuation assets are likely to be invested, has slumped 11 per cent since August, reducing the value of stocks by around $200 billion.  No doubt your superannuation has suffered part of this loss.

At the same time, home owners in Sydney, Melbourne, Perth and Darwin are seeing the value of their homes getting crunched.

Here are some examples.

Falling dollar reflects global concern all is not well in the Australian economy

Mon, 07 Jan 2019

The article first appeared on The Guardian website at this link: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/jan/03/falling-dollar-reflects-global-concern-all-is-not-well-in-the-australian-economy 

--------------------------------------------------------- 

Falling dollar reflects global concern all is not well in the Australian economy

The Australian dollar was hit hard overnight, Australian time, slumping below 70 US cents before a sharp and more extreme move saw it temporarily crash to a low of 67.40 US cents. It subsequently recovered marginally, but remains weak at around 69.40 US cents.

Rather than focus on the micro aspects of minute-by-minute or hour-by-hour moves in the dollar, which can be more noise than substance, the trend for the dollar over the past year has been down.

In January 2018, the Australian dollar was trading at 81.50 US cents.

There is increasing concern from global investors that all is not well with the Australian economy. Policy is in a do-nothing phase. Entrenched low wages growth is hampering growth in household spending. This is being complemented, in a negative way, by a sharp fall in wealth as house prices drop and the share market weakens, both of which will be a negative for the economy during 2019. This is because householders are simply not getting the income growth nor wealth accumulation needed to allow them to keep spending at a rate that will see the economy expand at a pace that will generate upside wage and inflation momentum. Strategies aimed at reducing debt and paring back new borrowings mean, by definition, weaker economic growth over the near term.